let it RAIN

Christopher Reck

RAIN is an acronym used for informal mindfulness practice. It’s an insightful form of self-inquiry you can cultivate in daily life, especially when you find yourself encountering moments of strong emotional reaction. Read more

is there another way to view this situation?

chrisReck

Sometimes it feels hard to keep yourself on the straight and narrow, to stay clear-headed, focused, balanced. I say 'sometimes' somewhat hesitantly because I know that for me it happens a lot. So I'm guessing that may be the case for you too. Therefore the question arises: how do you respond to such feelings? 

One place to start is to recognise that such disequilibrium has more to do with our perception of events than their reality. Read more

note to self: pay attention

chrisReck

The simple reality is this: you are what you pay attention to. Read more

how mental states become neural traits

chrisReck

Our quest for mindful awareness now takes us to Dr Rick Hanson’s book ‘Hardwiring Happiness’ in which he explains the practical science behind how you can take control of reshaping your brain, a process is known as Experience Dependent Neuroplasticity.

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tuning into the breath

chrisReck

The more you get to teach mindfulness the more you get to reacquaint yourself with each lesson's intention. That might seem like an obvious thing to say but you’d be surprised by how much you can get caught up and lost; how you need to recollect what anchors you. So, in the case of teaching the breathing meditation you may find yourself listening to people’s experience of its practice as if you are discovering this meditation for the first time. In so doing you rediscover it’s simple complexity. It’s ‘simplexity’.

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bringing awareness to the breath

chrisReck

As a teacher I regularly find myself dropping into awareness of slow breathing. Why so? Because it's a stress-busting sanity-saver. Plus, it’s free, and untainted by any Continuous Professional Development plan. What’s more, nobody knows you're doing it, except the person bringing conscious awareness to it; which is you.

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teach like you are many and no one

Christopher Reck


I found myself thinking of a story by the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges, called 'Everything and Nothing.' It's about Shakespeare at the end of his life, and how he gets into this talk with God.

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love the one you're not with

Christopher Reck


Our attention is fragmentary. But I guess that's the nature of our mind. However, the problem is that we live in a society – certainly in the last twenty five years or so – that seems to be almost predicated on an acceptance of being busy, distracted, tired, or overloaded. In other words, we are now willingly, effortlessly, unconsciously, caught up in our fragmentary attentional experiences. And of course this is compounded by our social media usage. 

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not noticing for noticing's sake

chrisReck

I just got to teaching the second session of the MBSR (Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction), and I realised that the first two sessions are about opening up to what we’re noticing, in body and mind. I then became aware of having to respond to questions around notions of just what it is we’re doing with all of this noticing. For instance, is it just about noticing? Is that what I’m supposed to be doing here? 

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you've got to make something good out of something bad

Christopher Reck

One of my favourite TED talks. Delivered by David Hoffman. A mindful response to adversity. A poem for an epiphany.

what happens when you lose everything

Newsletter

Every month or so I'll send out ideas and resources - what I think might be of interest and use to you, such as links to books, articles, podcasts, quotes, stories, art, music, meditations - that I hope will help inspire you to cultivate your own mindful life.